This Artist Created A Show Just For Dogs, And They Loved It

You might think dogs don’t care about art. But maybe that’s just because art isn’t created with dogs in mind.

Dominic Wilcox is changing that. The British designer’s canine-centric exhibition, commissioned by U.K. insurance company More Than, ran from Aug. 19–20 in London. The show was part of the company’s #PlayMore campaign, which encourages people to spend more time playing with their pets.

Mikael Buck / MORE TH>N
A border terrier and English pointer admire Drumstick Parkby Robert Nicol, a park scene.

The show included artwork painted in a canine-friendly color scheme, as well as large interactive pieces like a huge dog bowl filled with balls and an “open car window simulator” that involved a fan wafting around scents like meat and old shoes.

Mikael Buck / MORE TH>N
Cruising Caninesbeing enjoyed by a springer spaniel,an open car window simulator where a giant fan wafts a dogs favorite scents (such as raw meat and old shoes) through the air.

Wilcox says the canines approved.

“The dogs seemed to love their visit,” he told The Huffington Post in an email. “Tails were wagging like crazy at the giant dog food bowl filled with brown balls. They were jumping in and out of that one.”

Mikael Buck / MORE TH>N
Border terrier Bobbie jumps into Dinnertime Dreams.

The dogs’ enthusiasm is a credit to the research that went into the show.

“Even though the idea of the show is quite amusing on some level, I took the design of the artwork as seriously as any other work I do,” he said. “Through research I discovered that dogs can only see in yellows and blues mostly. By thinking about how the world looks to a dog it gave me the idea to commission some fellow artists to create wall-based work that dogs would appreciate. The colors needed to be within the dogs’ color spectrum and were shown at dog-eye level, low down.”

Mikael Buck / MORE TH>N
A springer spaniel with Catch, a multimedia installation that simulates a frisbee bouncing around a screen designed to captivate dogs.

He added that each work included a corresponding scent. A landscape featuring trees made of giant chicken drumsticks, for instance, smelled like chicken.

Wilcox says people keep asking him when he’s going to repeat the show, but he’s “waiting for the right offer.” He also wants to expand the scope of the exhibit. And he’s not ruling out a show for cats, either.

“Cats would be interesting,” he said. “I think some work could be shown high up so that they can jump up to see it, but that humans can’t get to. It’s all about the animals.”

More photos from the show:

  • Mikael Buck / MORE TH>N
    A border terrier, German Shepherd-Rottweiler and English pointer look at paintings in the exhibition.
  • Mikael Buck / MORE TH>N
    George the dachshund and Trebor the labrador enjoy “Dinnertime Dreams” an oversized 10-foot-wide dog bowl filled to the brim with over 1,000 play balls made to look like dog food.
  • Mikael Buck / MORE TH>N
    George the dachshund and Trebor the labrador enjoy “Dinnertime Dreams.”
  • Mikael Buck / MORE TH>N
  • Mikael Buck / MORE TH>N
    Dogs and their owners look at some of the artworks.
  • Mikael Buck / MORE TH>N
    Artist Dominic Wilcoxposes with one of the exhibits.
  • Mikael Buck / MORE TH>N
    Labrador Trebor in “Dinnertime Dreams.”

Read more: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/art-for-dogs-dominic-wilcox_us_57bde712e4b02673444db1f2?section=&